International program

Age of students

International High School Program is intended for students from 14 to 18 years old

Welcome to International School Maximilian, where students reach their potential through high academic standards and a nurturing environment!

International School Maximilian has built a curriculum around international specific needs, Starting from a foundation of core subjects, we added breadth and cross-curricular perspectives. Encouraging learners to engage with a variety of subjects, and make connections between them, is fundamental to our approach.

Our school offers a flexible and stimulating curriculum, supported with excellent resources and training.
For learners, we help improve performance by developing skills in creative thinking, inquiry and problem
solving. It is the perfect springboard to advanced study.
We develop learner knowledge, understanding and skills in: subject content, applying knowledge and
understanding to new as well as unfamiliar situations, intellectual inquiry, flexibility and responsiveness to
change, working and communicating in English, influencing outcomes, and cultural awareness. 

The international middle school program is typically for learners aged 14 to 16 years. It builds on the foundations of Secondary program, although it is not essential to have completed that stage before beginning the middle years program.

SUBJECTS

For students 14 to 16 years old. During Grades 9 and 10, our students study 9 compulsory courses:

English language syllabuses are available for learners whose first language is English and for those with good English skills, but who are not native speakers. The syllabuses develop the ability to communicate clearly, accurately and effectively in both speech and writing, for study and employment.

  • English – First Language
  • English – Second Language
  • English – Literature
  • World Literature

UPPER SECONDARY ENGLISH – FIRST LANGUAGE

Lower secondary First Language English is designed for learners whose first language is English. The course enables learners to:

  • develop the ability to communicate clearly, accurately and effectively when speaking and writing
  • use a wide range of vocabulary, and the correct grammar, spelling and punctuation
  • develop a personal style and an awareness of the audience being addressed.

Learners are also encouraged to read widely, both for their own enjoyment and to further their awareness of the ways in which English can be used.Lower Secondary First Language English also develops more general analysis and communication skills such as inference, and the ability to order facts and present opinions effectively.

UPPER SECONDARY ENGLISH – SECOND LANGUAGE

Lower Secondary English as a Second Language is designed for learners who already have a working knowledge of the language and who want to consolidate their understanding in order to progress in their academic or professional career. The qualification reflects the widespread use of English in education and commerce, and also in entertainment.
The aim is to achieve a level of practical communication ideal for everyday use, which can also form the basis for further, more in-depth language study.

The Macedonian course fully corresponds to the national framework for Macedonian language.

An essential subject for all learners, mathematics syllabuses encourage the development of mathematical knowledge as a key life skill, and as a basis for more advanced study.

  • Mathematics
  • Mathematics – Additional
  • International Mathematics

The syllabus aims to build learners’ confidence by helping them develop competence and fluency with mathematical concepts, methods and skills, as well as a feel for numbers, patterns and relationships. The syllabus also places a strong emphasis on solving problems and presenting and interpreting results. Learners also gain an understanding of how to communicate and reason using mathematical concepts.

The syllabus aims summarise the context in which you should view the syllabus content and describe the purposes of a course based on this syllabus. They are not listed in order of priority.

The aims are to enable students to:

  • develop their mathematical knowledge and oral, written and practical skills in a way which encourages con dence and provides satisfaction and enjoyment
    read mathematics, and write and talk about the subject in a variety of ways
  • develop a feel for number, carry out calculations and understand the signi cance of the results obtained
  • apply mathematics in everyday situations and develop an understanding of the part which mathematics plays in the world around them
  • solve problems, present the solutions clearly, check and interpret the results
  • develop an understanding of mathematical principles
  • recognise when and how a situation may be represented mathematically, identify and interpret relevant factors and, where necessary, select an appropriate mathematical method to solve the problem
  • use mathematics as a means of communication with emphasis on the use of clear expression
  • develop an ability to apply mathematics in other subjects, particularly science and technology
  • develop the abilities to reason logically, to classify, to generalise and to prove
  • appreciate patterns and relationships in mathematics
  • produce and appreciate imaginative and creative work arising from mathematical ideas
  • develop their mathematical abilities by considering problems and conducting individual and co-operative enquiry and experiment, including extended pieces of work of a practical and investigative kind
  • appreciate the interdependence of different branches of mathematics
  • acquire a foundation appropriate to their further study of mathematics and of other disciplines.

All students will study the following topics:

  1. Number
  2. Algebra and graphs
  3. Geometry
  4. Mensuration
  5. Co-ordinate geometry
  6. Trigonometry
  7. Matrices and transformations
  8. Probability
  9. Statistics

Candidates study the following topics:

  1. Characteristics and classification of living organisms
  2. Organisation of the organism
  3. Movement in and out of cells
  4. Biological molecules
  5. Enzymes
  6. Plant nutrition
  7. Human nutrition
  8. Transport in plants
  9. Transport in animals
  10. Diseases and immunity
  11. Gas exchange in humans
  12. Respiration
  13. Excretion in humans
  14. Coordination and response
  15. Drugs
  16. Reproduction
  17. Inheritance
  18. Variation and selection
  19. Organisms and their environment
  20. Biotechnology and genetic engineering
  21. Human influences on ecosystems

Key benefits
Biology enables learners to:

  • increase their understanding of the technological world
    take an informed interest in scientific matters
  • recognise the usefulness (and limitations) of scientific method, and how to apply this to other disciplines and in everyday life
  • develop relevant attitudes, such as a concern for accuracy and precision, objectivity, integrity, enquiry, initiative and inventiveness
  • develop an interest in, and care for, the environment
  • better understand the influences and limitations placed on scientific study by society, economy, technology, ethics, the community and the environment
  • develop an understanding of the scientific skills essential for both further study and everyday life

Our programmes balance a thorough knowledge and understanding of a subject and help to develop the skills learners need for their next steps in education or employment.

Candidates study the following topics:

  1. The particulate nature of matter
  2. Experimental techniques
  3. Atoms, elements and compounds
  4. Stoichiometry
  5. Electricity and chemistry
  6. Chemical energetics
  7. Chemical reactions
  8.  Acids, bases and salts
  9. The Periodic Table
  10. Metals
  11. Air and water
  12. Sulfur
  13. Carbonates
  14. Organic chemistry

Key benefits
Chemistry enables learners to:

  • increase their understanding of the technological world
  • take an informed interest in scientific matters
  • recognise the usefulness (and limitations) of scientific method, and how to apply this to other disciplines and in everyday life
  • develop relevant attitudes, such as a concern for accuracy and precision, objectivity, integrity, enquiry, initiative and inventiveness
  • develop an interest in, and care for, the environment
  • better understand the influence and limitations placed on scientific study by society, economy, technology, ethics, the community and the environment
  • develop an understanding of the scientific skills essential for both further study and everyday life.

Our programmes balance a thorough knowledge and understanding of a subject and help to develop the skills learners need for their next steps in education or employment.

Physics enables learners to:

  • increase their understanding of the technological world
    take an informed interest in scientific matters
  • recognise the usefulness (and limitations) of scientific method, and how to apply this to other disciplines and in everyday life
  • develop relevant attitudes, such as a concern for accuracy and precision, objectivity, integrity, enquiry, initiative and inventiveness
  • develop an interest in, and care for, the environment
  • better understand the influence and limitations placed on scientific study by society, economy, technology, ethics, the community and the environment
  • develop an understanding of the scientific skills essential for both further study and everyday life.

Candidates study the following topics:

  1. General physics
  2. Thermal physics
  3. Properties of waves, including light and sound
  4.  Electricity and magnetism
  5. Atomic physics

All candidates study all the Core Content in either:

Option A
The nineteenth century: the development of modern nation states, 1848–1914
The content focuses on the following Key Questions:

  • Were the Revolutions of 1848 important?
  • How was Italy unified?
  • How was Germany unified?
  • Why was there a civil war in the United
  • States and what were its results?
  • Why, and with what effects, did Europeans expand their overseas empires in the nineteenth century?
  • What caused the First World War?

or:

Option B
The twentieth century: international relations since 1919
The content focuses on the following Key Questions:

  • Were the peace treaties of 1919–23 fair?
  • To what extent was the League of Nations a success?
  • Why had international peace collapsed by 1939?
  • Who was to blame for the Cold War?
  • How effectively did the United States contain the spread of Communism?
  • How secure was the USSR’s control over Eastern Europe, 1948–c.1989?
  • Why did events in the Gulf matter, c.1970–2000?

In addition, all candidates must also study at least one of the following Depth Studies:

  • The First World War, 1914–18
  • Germany, 1918–45
  • Russia, 1905–41
  • The United States, 1919–41
  • China, c.1930–c.1990
  • South Africa, c.1940–c.1994
  • Israelis and Palestinians since 1945

Key benefits
History offers the opportunity to study world history from the nineteenth century to the beginning of the twenty-first century. It encourages learners to raise questions and to develop and deploy historical skills, knowledge and understanding in order to provide historical explanations. Learners will explore history from a diversity of perspectives, including social, economical, cultural and political, and are given the opportunity to:

  • develop an interest in and enthusiasm for learning about and understanding the past
  • explore historical concepts such as cause and consequence, change and continuity, and similarity and difference
  • appreciate historical evidence and how to use it
  • gain a greater understanding of international issues and inter-relationships
  • learn how to present clear, logical arguments.

The German syllabus enables learners to achieve greater fluency, accuracy and confidence in the language as it is spoken and written, and improve their communication skills.
They will learn how to improve their use of German in a variety of situations, understanding how to read texts and other source materials, and how to extract information, initiate conversations and respond to questions both orally and in writing.

About the syllabus
The German language syllabus is accepted by universities and employers as proof of linguistic ability and understanding. Successful language students gain lifelong skills, including:

  • the ability to communicate confidently and clearly in the target language
  • a sound understanding of the nature of language and language study, and of the skills and abilities required for further study, work and leisure
  • insight into the culture and contemporary society of countries where the language is spoken
  • better integration into communities where the language is spoken
  • positive attitudes towards language learning, towards the speakers of other languages, and towards other cultures and societies
  • skills which can be used in other areas of learning, such as analysis and memory skills.

The Physical Education syllabus is both practical and theoretical, covering anatomy and physiology, movement skills and contemporary studies in sport. Learners are encouraged to try out a range of physical activities, including team and individual sports, games, and outdoor activities, and then use the theoretical knowledge they have gained to analyse the different factors influencing performance.

The course also encourages learners to understand and explain global trends in Physical Education and Sport.

Each student also chooses two options to round out their schedule. Options may include:

The Art and Design syllabus considers expression and communication. Learners gain an understanding of visual perception and aesthetic experience, and the ways in which art and design creates a language of its own.
Most of the work for this syllabus is practical or studio based, so that learners can develop their abilities of observation and analysis of the visual world, sensitivity, skill, personal expression and imagination. They also learn how to relate their skills to an enhanced knowledge of their own cultures, past and present, as well as an appreciation of practical design problems.

The key concepts for Art & Design are:

  • Communication
    An essential purpose of any piece of art and design is to communicate, from the simplest sketch to the most complex work. Artists and designers need to understand that the relationship their work builds with the audience is influenced by many things, including their chosen media and methods. Effective communication is also essential for operating in today’s art and design world, which demands collaboration and engagement with wider cultures and movements.
  • Creativity
    Creativity is at the heart of an artist or designer’s processes. It pushes them to question, investigate, experiment and take risks to create work that is original and meaningful. Creative practitioners use curiosity, imagination and innovation to solve art and design problems in new ways.
  • Intention
    An intention is the starting point of any project, from which an artist or designer starts to develop ideas. An intention or purpose can come from a brief, proposal or research, while at other times it might begin as an idea or feeling. Though an intention is the reason to start a project, it is important to understand that the intention can evolve as work develops.
  • Materials and processes
    Experimentation with materials and processes builds confidence, and helps develop awareness of spatial, textural and colour relationships, which are fundamental to art and design. A skilful artist or designer selects the materials and processes that communicate their message in the most effective way.
  • Critical reflection
    Critical reflection is the ongoing process that helps artists and designers to learn what works and what doesn’t. Artists and designers need to evaluate how the materials, techniques and processes they choose affect how their work communicates meaning. This process can help work become more relevant and coherent.
  • Research and context
    First-hand research helps artists and designers to develop their ideas and refine their practice. Actively researching and responding to other practitioners, cultures and creative movements gives the artist or designer a broad view of the world. An artist or designer can use this to improve their practice and understand how their work connects with its intended audience.

The Music course encourages learners to develop their musical skills in a variety of music styles and traditions and build on their musical interests. Learners are encouraged to listen, compose and perform with understanding, analysis and confident communication. They learn to become independent and critical thinkers.

The Music course provides a foundation for the study of music or related courses in higher education.

The syllabus enables students to understand and appreciate the nature and scope of business, and the role it plays in society. It encourages students to examine the process of decision-making in a dynamic and changing business environment and to develop critical understanding of business organizations. They learn about business and its environment, human resource management, marketing, operations management and finance and accounting. At Business Studies course students also learn how to develop a business strategy.
The key concepts on which this syllabus is built are set out below. The course will refer again and again to these concepts, which can serve as guiding principles when considering both familiar and unfamiliar business issues and contexts.

  • Change is the only constant. Exciting new enterprises are often created in response to economic, cultural or technological changes. Existing businesses must adapt to change if they are to survive and grow.
  • Management is relevant to every person in a business. Good leadership, strong motivation in workers, effective systems and clear communication are hallmarks of successful businesses.
  • Customer focus means a business will design and produce goods and services that people want to buy. Customers provide the revenue which sustains a business. Successful businesses really understand their customers and strive to provide products that their customers love.
  • Innovation enables a business to re-invent itself and stay ahead of the competition. The business world is dynamic and companies must seek to innovate through product development, more efficient processes and finding better ways ‘to do business’.
  • Creating value is the core reason why any organisation exists. Effective organisations aim to maximise stakeholder value. For most businesses this will be about maximising shareholder value, but social enterprises will also have other, non-financial, aims. Stakeholders also need to measure the value that is created.
  • Strategy is about knowing where you are, where you want to get to and how you are going to get there. Managers need to think about, decide on and put into action major long term plans – such as buying another business, entering a new market or developing a new technology.

The aim of the Computer Science syllabus is to encourage learners to develop an understanding of the fundamental principles of computer science and how computer programs work in a range of contexts.
Learners will study topics including information representation, communication and Internet technologies, hardware, software development, and relational database modeling. As they progress, learners will develop their computational thinking and use problem solving to develop computer-based solutions using algorithms and programming languages. Studying Computer Science will help learners develop a range of skills such as thinking creatively, analytically, logically and critically.

They will also be able to appreciate the ethical issues that arise with current and emerging computing technologies.

The Introduction to Psychology course is designed to introduce students to the biological and theoretical foundations of psychology. The course will encourage students to develop analytical skills, conduct research, investigate the mind-body connection, analyze concepts of consciousness, evaluate theories of personality, develop an understanding of psychological disorders, evaluate the role and effectiveness of treatments and analyze theories of intelligence. Students will be expected to demonstrate their understanding of psychology through various projects, discussions and assignments.

Meeting government ministers, organising a local river clean-up project and writing to the United Nations about climate change, are just some of the activities learners are pursuing through the Project Activities course.

The PA course is a groundbreaking and stimulating course that stretches across traditional subject boundaries and develops transferable skills. It is both cross-curricular and skills-based and taps into the way learners of today enjoy learning, including team work, presentations, projects, and working with other learners around the world. The emphasis is on developing the ability to think critically about a range of global issues where there is always more than one point of view.

The PA course provides opportunities for inquiry key global issues from a personal, local/national and global perspective.

Young people globally face unprecedented challenges in an interconnected and information-heavy world, not least in how they will gain a sense of their own active place in the world and cope with changes that will impact on their life chances and life choices.

Students will have opportunities to acquire and apply a range of skills, including:

  • gathering, synthesizing and communicating information
  • collaborating with others to achieve a common outcome
  • analyzing and evaluating planning, processes and outcomes
  • developing and justifying a line of reasoning
  • Students will explore stimulating topics that have global significance. They will assess information critically and explore lines of reasoning. They will learn to collaborate with others from another culture, community or country, directing much of their own learning and developing an independence of thought.The syllabus emphasizes the development and application of skills rather than the acquisition of knowledge. Students will develop transferable skills that will be useful for further study and for young people as active citizens of the future.

The PA course encourages awareness of global problems and offers opportunities to explore possible solutions through cooperation and collaboration. The course is not about getting everybody to think identically; rather it is a matter of opening minds to the great complexity of the world and of human thought, and opening hearts to the diversity of human experience and feeling.

Age of students

For students 16 to 18 years old

Our programmes and qualifications set the global standard for international education. They are created by subject experts, rooted in academic rigour and reflect the latest educational research. They provide a strong platform for students to progress from one stage to the next, and are well supported by teaching and learning resources.

We review all our syllabuses regularly, so they reflect the latest research evidence and professional teaching practice – and take account of the different national contexts in which they are taught.

We consult with teachers to help us design each syllabus around the needs of their learners. Consulting with leading universities has helped us make sure our syllabuses encourage students to master the key concepts in the subject and develop the skills necessary for success in higher education.

Following our International programme helps students develop abilities which universities value highly, including:

a deep understanding of their subjects
higher order thinking skills – analysis, critical thinking, problem solving
presenting ordered and coherent arguments
independent learning and research.

SUBJECTS

For students 16 to 18 years old. During Grades 11 and 12

Content overview

1 Pure Mathematics 1
1.1 Quadratics
1.2 Functions
1.3 Coordinate geometry 1.4 Circular measure
1.5 Trigonometry
1.6 Series
1.7 Differentiation
1.8 Integration
2 Pure Mathematics 2
2.1 Algebra
2.2 Logarithmic and exponential functions 2.3 Trigonometry
2.4 Differentiation
2.5 Integration
2.6 Numerical solution of equations
3 Pure Mathematics 3
3.1 Algebra
3.2 Logarithmic and exponential functions 3.3 Trigonometry
3.4 Differentiation
3.5 Integration
3.6 Numerical solution of equations
3.7 Vectors
3.8 Differential equations
3.9 Complex numbers
4 Mechanics
4.1 Forces and equilibrium
4.2 Kinematics of motion in a straight line 4.3 Momentum
4.4 Newton’s laws of motion
4.5 Energy, work and power
5 Probability & Statistics 1
5.1 Representation of data
5.2 Permutations and combinations 5.3 Probability
5.4 Discrete random variables
5.5 The normal distribution
6 Probability & Statistics 2
6.1 The Poisson distribution
6.2 Linear combinations of random variables 6.3 Continuous random variables
6.4 Sampling and estimation
6.5 Hypothesis tests

Key concepts
Key concepts are essential ideas that help students develop a deep understanding of their subject and make links between different aspects. Key concepts may open up new ways of thinking about, understanding or interpreting the important things to be learned.

Good teaching and learning will incorporate and reinforce a subject’s key concepts to help students gain:

  • a greater depth as well as breadth of subject knowledge confidence, especially in applying knowledge and skills in new situations
  • the vocabulary to discuss their subject conceptually and show how different aspects link together
  • a level of mastery of their subject to help them enter higher education.

The key concepts identified below, carefully introduced and developed, will help to underpin
the course you will teach. You may identify additional key concepts which will also enrich
teaching and learning.

Problem solving
Mathematics is fundamentally problem solving and representing systems and models in different ways. These include:

  • Algebra: this is an essential tool which supports and expresses mathematical reasoning and provides a means to generalise across a number of contexts.
  • Geometrical techniques: algebraic representations also describe a spatial relationship, which gives us a new way to understand a situation.
  • Calculus: this is a fundamental element which describes change in dynamic situations and underlines the links between functions and graphs.
  • Mechanical models: these explain and predict how particles and objects move or remain stable under the influence of forces.
  • Statistical methods: these are used to quantify and model aspects of the world around us. Probability theory predicts how chance events might proceed, and whether assumptions about chance are justified by evidence.

Syllabus overview

Aims
The aims describe the purposes of a course based on this syllabus. The aims are to enable
students to:

  • enjoy the experience of reading literature
  • develop an appreciation of and an informed personal response to literature in English in a range of texts in different forms, and from different periods and cultures
  • communicate effectively, accurately and appropriately in written form
  • develop the interdependent skills of reading, analysis and communication
  • analyse and evaluate the methods writers use in creating meaning and effects
  • encourage wider reading and an understanding of how it may contribute to personal development
  • build a firm foundation for further study of literature.

Key benefits
Following our International programme helps students develop abilities which universities value
highly, including:

  • a deep understanding of their subjects
  • higher order thinking skills – analysis, critical thinking, problem solving
  • presenting ordered and coherent arguments
  • independent learning and research.

Literature in English encourages learners to be: confident, exploring texts and ideas with selfassurance, intellectual freedom and personal insight, responsible, committing to their learning and developing approaches to critical analysis to better understand ideas of culture, context and the community reflective, considering literary ideas and concepts that are presented in a range of everchanging contexts innovative, approaching tasks and texts with a combination of creative, original and flexible thinking engaged, recognising and interrogating the role literature plays in matters of personal, social and global significance.

Syllabus overview

1.1 Content
Candidates for Cambridge International AS Level Biology study the following topics:
1. 1 Cell structure
2. 2 Biological molecules
3. 3 Enzymes
4. 4 Cell membranes and transport
5. 5 The mitotic cell cycle
6. 6 Nucleic acids and protein synthesis
7. 7 Transport in plants
8. 8 Transport in mammals
9. 9 Gas exchange and smoking
10.10 Infectious disease
11.11 Immunity
12 Energy and respiration 13 Photosynthesis
14 Homeostasis
15 Control and co-ordination 16 Inherited change
17 Selection and evolution
18 Biodiversity, classification and conservation 19 Genetic technology

Key concepts
Key concepts are essential ideas, theories, principles or mental tools that help learners to develop a deep understanding of their subject and make links between the different topics

Syllabus overview

1.1 Content
Candidates for Cambridge International AS Level Physics study the following topics:

  • Physical quantities and units
  • Measurement techniques
  • Kinematics
  • Dynamics
  • Forces, density and pressure
  • Work, energy and power
  • Deformation of solids
    Waves
  • Superposition
  • Electric fields
  • Current of electricity
  • D.C. circuits
  • Particle and nuclear physics
  • Motion in a circle
  • Gravitational fields
  • Ideal gases
  • Temperature
  • Thermal properties of materials
  • Oscillations
  • Communication
  • Capacitance
  • Electronics
  • Magnetic fields
  • Electromagnetic induction
  • Alternating currents
  • Quantum physics

All candidates study practical skills.

Key concepts
Models of physical systems

Physics is the science that seeks to understand the behaviour of the Universe. The development of models of physical systems is central to physics. Models simplify, explain and predict how physical systems behave.

  • Testing predictions against evidence.

Physical models are usually based on prior observations, and their predictions are tested to check that they are consistent with the behaviour of the real world. This testing requires evidence, often obtained from experiments.

  • Mathematics as a language and problem-solving tool.

Mathematics is integral to physics, as it is the language that is used to express physical principles and models. It is also a tool to analyse theoretical models, solve quantitative problems and produce predictions.

  • Matter, energy and waves.

Everything in the Universe comprises matter and/or energy. Waves are a key mechanism for the transfer of energy and are essential to many modern applications of physics.

  • Forces and fields.

The way that matter and energy interact is through forces and fields. The behaviour of the Universe is governed by fundamental forces that act over different length scales and magnitudes. These include the gravitational force and the electromagnetic force.

Syllabus overview
1 Business and its environmen

  • Enterprise
  • Business structure
  • Size of business
  • Business objectives
  • Stakeholders in a business

2 People in organisations

  • Management and leadership
  • Motivation
  • Human resource management

3 Marketing

  • What is marketing?
  • Market research
  • The marketing mix

4 Operations and project management

  • The nature of operations
  • Operations planning
  • Inventory management

5 Finance and accounting

  • The need for business finance
  • Sources of finance
  • Costs
  • Accounting fundamentals
  • Forecasting cash flows and managing working capital

6 Strategic management

  • What is strategic management?
  • Strategic analysis
  • Strategic choice
  • Strategic implementation

Key concepts
Change is the only constant. Exciting new enterprises are often created in response to economic, cultural or technological changes. Existing businesses must adapt to change if they are to survive and grow.
– Management is relevant to every person in a business. Good leadership, strong motivation in
workers, effective systems and clear communication are hallmarks of successful businesses.
– Customer focus means a business will design and produce goods and services that people want
to buy. Customers provide the revenue which sustains a business. Successful businesses really
understand their customers and strive to provide products that their customers love.
– Innovation enables a business to re-invent itself and stay ahead of the competition. The business
world is dynamic and companies must seek to innovate through product development, more efficient
processes and finding better ways ‘to do business’.
– Creating value is the core reason why any organisation exists. Effective organisations aim to
maximise stakeholder value. For most businesses this will be about maximising shareholder value,
but social enterprises will also have other, non-financial, aims. Stakeholders also need to measure
the value that is created.
– Strategy is about knowing where you are, where you want to get to and how you are going to get
there. Managers need to think about, decide on and put into action major long term plans – such as
buying another business, entering a new market or developing a new technology.

Syllabus overview

1 Basic economic ideas and resource allocation
Scarcity, choice and opportunity cost

  • Positive and normative statements
  • Factors of production
  • Resource allocation in different economic systems and issues of transition
  • Production possibility curves
  • Money
  • Classification of goods and services


2 The price system and the micro economy
Demand and supply curves

  • Price elasticity, income elasticity and cross-elasticities of demand
  • Price elasticity of supply
  • Interaction of demand and supply
  • Market equilibrium and disequilibrium
  • Consumer and producer surplus

3 Government microeconomic intervention

  • Maximum and minimum prices
  • Taxes (direct and indirect)
  • Subsidies
  • Transfer payments
  • Direct provision of goods and services
  • Nationalisation and privatisation

4 The macro economy

  • Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply analysis
  • Inflation
  • Balance of payments
  • Exchange rates
  • The terms of trade
  • Principles of absolute and comparative advantage
  • Protectionism

5 Government macro intervention

  • Types of policy: fiscal, monetary and supply side policy
  • Policies to correct balance of payments disequilibrium
  • Policies to correct inflation and deflation

Key concepts
Scarcity and choice
The fundamental problem in economics is that resources are scarce and wants are unlimited, so there is always a choice required between competing uses for the resources.
– The margin and change.
Decision-making by individuals, firms and governments is based on choices at the margin; that is, once behaviour has been optimised, any change will be detrimental as long as conditions remain the same.
– Equilibrium and efficiency. Prices are set by markets, are always moving in to and out of equilibrium, and can be both efficient and inefficient in different ways and over different time periods.
– Regulation and equity. There is a trade-off between, on the one hand, freedom for firms and individuals in unregulated markets and, on the other hand, greater social equality and equity through the government regulation of individuals and markets.
– Progress and development.
Economics studies how societies can progress in measurable money terms and develop in a wider more normative sense.

Syllabus content

Section 1
Theory Fundamentals
1.1 Information representation 1.1.1 Number representation 1.1.2 Images
1.1.3 Sound
1.1.4 Video
1.1.5 Compression techniques
1. 1.2 Communication and Internet technologies
1.2.1 Networks
1.2.2 IP addressing
1.2.3 Client- and server-side scripting
2. 1.3 Hardware
1.3.1 Input, output and storage devices 1.3.2 Main memory
1.3.3 Logic gates and logic circuits
3. 1.4 Processor fundamentals
1.4.1 CPU architecture
1.4.2 The fetch-execute cycle
1.4.3 The processor’s instruction set 1.4.4 Assembly language
4. 1.5 System software
1.5.1 Operating system 1.5.2 Utility programs 1.5.3 Library programs 1.5.4 Language translators
5. 1.6 Security, privacy and data integrity 1.6.1 Data security
1.6.2 Data integrity
6. 1.7 Ethics and ownership 1.7.1 Ethics
1.7.2 Ownership
7. 1.8 Database and data modelling
1. 1.8.1 Database Management Systems (DBMS)
2. 1.8.2 Relational database modelling
3. 1.8.3 Data Definition Language (DDL) and Data Manipulation Language (DML)

Section 2
Fundamental Problem-solving and Programming
2.1 Algorithm design and problem-solving 2.1.1 Algorithms
2.1.2 Structure chart
2.1.3 Corrective maintenance
2.1.4 Adaptive maintenance
1. 2.2 Data representation
2.2.1 Data types 2.2.2 Arrays 2.2.3 Files
2. 2.3 Programming
2.3.1 Programming basics 2.3.2 Transferable skills
2.3.3 Selection
2.3.4 Iteration
2.3.5 Built-in functions
2.3.6 Structured programming
3. 2.4 Software development 2.4.1 Programming 2.4.2 Program testing 2.4.3 Testing strategies

Section 3
Advanced Theory
3.1 Data representation
3.1.1 User-defined data types
3.1.2 File organisation and access
3.1.3 Real numbers and normalised floating-point representation
1. 3.2 Communication and Internet technologies 3.2.1 Protocols
3.2.2 Circuit switching, packet switching and routers
3.2.3 Local Area Networks (LAN)
2. 3.3 Hardware
3.3.1 Logic gates and circuit design 3.3.2 Boolean algebra
3.3.3 Karnaugh Maps
3.3.4 Flip-flops
3.3.5 RISC processors
3.3.6 Parallel processing
3. 3.4 System software
3.4.1 Purposes of an operating system (OS) 3.4.2 Virtual machine
3.4.3 Translation software
4. 3.5 Security
3.5.1 Asymmetric keys and encryption methods 3.5.2 Digital signatures and digital certificates 3.5.3
Encryption protocols
3.5.4 Malware
5. 3.6 Monitoring and control systems
3.6.1 Overview of monitoring and control systems 3.6.2 Bit manipulation to monitor and control
devices

Section 4
Further Problem-solving and Programming Skills
4.1 Computational thinking and problem-solving 4.1.1 Abstraction
4.1.2 Algorithms
4.1.3 Abstract Data Types (ADT)
4.1.4 Recursion
1. 4.2 Algorithm design methods
4.2.1 Decision tables
4.2.2 Jackson Structured Programming (JSP) 4.2.3 State-transition diagrams
2. 4.3 Further programming
1. 4.3.1 Programming paradigms

Low-level programming Imperative programming Object-oriented programming Declarative
programming
2. 4.3.2 File processing
3. 4.3.3 Exception handling
4. 4.3.4 Use of development tools / programming environments
3. 4.4 Software development
4.4.1 Stages of software development 4.4.2 Testing
4.4.3 Project management

Syllabus aims
The aims of a course based on International Computer Science are:
to develop computational thinking
to develop an understanding of the main principles of solving problems using computers
to develop an understanding that every computer system is made up of subsystems, which in turn consist of further subsystems
to develop an understanding of the component parts of computer systems and how they interrelate, including software, data, hardware, communications and people
to acquire the skills necessary to apply this understanding to develop computer-based solutions to problems.

Key concepts
Key concepts are essential ideas that help students develop a deep understanding of their subject and make links between different aspects. Key concepts may open up new ways of thinking about, understanding or interpreting the important things to be learned.

The key concepts for International Art & Design are:

  • Communication
    An essential purpose of any piece of art and design is to communicate, from the
    simplest sketch to the most complex work. Artists and designers need to understand
    that the relationship their work builds with the audience is influenced by many
    things, including their chosen media and methods. Effective communication is also
    essential for operating in today’s art and design world, which demands collaboration
    and engagement with wider cultures and movements.
  • Creativity
    Creativity is at the heart of an artist or designer’s processes. It pushes them to
    question, investigate, experiment and take risks to create work that is original and
    meaningful. Creative practitioners use curiosity, imagination and innovation to solve
    art and design problems in new ways.
  • Intention
    An intention is the starting point of any project, from which an artist or designer
    starts to develop ideas. An intention or purpose can come from a brief, proposal or
    research, while at other times it might begin as an idea or feeling. Though an
    intention is the reason to start a project, it is important to understand that the
    intention can evolve as work develops.
  • Materials and processes
    Experimentation with materials and processes builds confidence, and helps develop
    awareness of spatial, textural and colour relationships, which are fundamental to art
    and design. A skilful artist or designer selects the materials and processes that
    communicate their message in the most effective way.
  • Critical reflection
    Critical reflection is the ongoing process that helps artists and designers to learn
    what works and what doesn’t. Artists and designers need to evaluate how the
    materials, techniques and processes they choose affect how their work
    communicates meaning. This process can help work become more relevant and
    coherent.
  • Research and context
    First-hand research helps artists and designers to develop their ideas and refine
    their practice. Actively researching and responding to other practitioners, cultures
    and creative movements gives the artist or designer a broad view of the world. An
    artist or designer can use this to improve their practice and understand how their
    work connects with its intended audience.

Syllabus overview

 

  • Fine art
    Candidates may focus on one or combine several of the following:
    painting
    sculpture
    print making
    experimental – assemblage/construction.
    drawing
    photography
    mixed media
  • Graphic communication
    illustration
    packaging design
    advertising
    typography.
    print making
    branding signage
  • Three-dimensional design
    sculpture, ceramics
    interior and exterior architecture
    environmental design
    jewellery and fashion accessories.
    product design
    interior design
    set design
  • Textiles and fashion
    fashion design and/or illustration
    costume design
    constructed textiles
    screen printing
    batik
    surface pattern.
    digital-printed textiles

Syllabus aims

  • develop the ability to understand a language from a variety of registers
  • enable students to communicate confidently and clearly in the target language
  • form a sound base of skills, language and attitudes required for further study, work and leisure
  • develop insights into the culture and civilisation of the countries where the language is spoken, including the study of literary texts where appropriate
  • encourage positive attitudes to language learning and a sympathetic approach to other cultures and civilisations
  • support intellectual and personal development by promoting learning and social skills.

Topic areas
Human relationships
Family
Generation gap
Young people
Patterns of daily life
Urban and rural life
The media
Food and drink
Law and order
Philosophy and belief
Health and fitness
Work and leisure
Equality of opportunity
Employment and unemployment
Sport
Free time activities
Travel and tourism
Education
Cultural life/heritage
War and peace
Social and economic development
Scientific and medical advances
Technological innovation
Environment
Conservation
Pollution
Contemporary aspects of the country or countries where the language is spoken

GRADING PARAMETERS

Assessment
Homework
Participation
Comprehension
Knowledge Application
Behavior

INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL MAXIMILIAN GRADING SCALE SCHOOL YEAR 2020/21

GRADE:

PERCENTAGE RANGE:

5+


95% – 100%

5


85% - 94%

4


75% - 84%

3


65% - 74%

2


50% - 64%

1


0 - 49%